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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
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Is it really necessary to consider entire India as one entity while implementing important policies?


 Department of Microbiology, Dr. D Y Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Dr. D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission16-Sep-2020
Date of Decision25-Sep-2020
Date of Acceptance03-Oct-2020

Correspondence Address:
Rajashri Patil,
Flat No 402, G wing, Richwood Society, Sector 11, Spine Road, Chikhli Pradhikaran, Pimpri, Pune - 411 019, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_515_20



How to cite this URL:
Das NK, Mirza S, Vyawahare CR, Patil R. Is it really necessary to consider entire India as one entity while implementing important policies?. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth [Epub ahead of print] [cited 2022 Dec 1]. Available from: https://www.mjdrdypv.org/preprintarticle.asp?id=336449



Dear Sir,

We have gone through your article titled Chasing the Virus: Not Only Difficult but Impossible. Are we going to Hit a Dead End?”[1]

You have absolutely hit the nail on the head by mentioning that it is going to be a futile exercise by going for contact tracing now. The government bodies and its human resources must be under a lot of stress by this strenuous work of door to door surveillance, telephonic enquiries, and record keepings associated with contact tracing. With reports of having a reliable vaccine months away and with falling of foot soldiers, it must be difficult to keep the morale of the tribe high.[2] One more thing we would like to highlight here is, whether it is fair to consider a country like ours as a single entity. With demography of each state differing so significantly, would it be really wise to apply the combined data to the policy of each state. For example, the state of Maharashtra is worst affected in India, and its population is in the size of Japan.[3] Hence, in this case, contact tracing may not be worthwhile, but what if we consider smaller states say Mizoram and Sikkim, which has a very low number of cases, are somewhat isolated geographically and does not have much problem of migration. Hence, contact tracing may not be a bad idea there. Hence, the epidemic management and decision-making have to vary taking the local factors into consideration.

But is it really the don of all pandemics? The world has seen far more deadly pandemics than this, which has wiped up fractions of world population. This toothless don had the advantage of a weapon which no other organism had, that is Information and Technology. So with this, it has been able to spread the fear factor at the speed of knots.[4]

But we think, the public is smarter than the decision-making bodies. They know that, they are for in for a long haul in respect to Covid-19 pandemic. That's why you can find them at all places and smashing all principles of social distancing with a mask below their chins (sarcastic comment). We really think that because the world missed the first stage of the disease, it is actually going to be nearly impossible for us to reach the end game for this particular virus. There are many reasons for this. But the most significant is the large number of asymptomatic cases, which allowed it to spread like a wild fire. Maybe with time it will become endemic like a seasonal flu-like illness or like a rhinovirus which has a near perfect relation with human beings.[5]

The case fatalities are more in the developed countries even with more testing. This may be due to aging population of west along with vast difference in the genetic makeup, the level of immunity and our exposure to different organisms since childhood. With reports emerging of reinfections and the doubtfulness of the utility of protective antibodies, how much can we rely on herd immunity actually?

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Banerjee A. Chasing the virus: Not only difficult but impossible. Are we going to hit a dead end? Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth 2020;13:425-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Crawford NW, Buttery J. Halting Oxford's Covid-19 vaccine trial is not a setback; it shows prudence. Available from: https://www.business-standard.com/article/international/halting-oxford-s-covid-19-vaccine-trial-is-not-a-setback-it-shows-prudence-120091200413_1.html. [Last assessed on 2020 Oct 01].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Coronavirus outbreaks, India cases. Available from: https://www.ndtv.com/coronavirus/india-covid-19-tracker. [Last assessed on 2020 Oct 01].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Debiec J. Fear can spread from person to person faster than the coronavirus– but there are ways to slow it down. Available from: https://theconversation.com/fear-can-spread-from-person-to-person-faster-than-the-coronavirus-but-there-are-ways-to-slow-it-down-133129. [Last assessed on 2020 Oct 01].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Hamblin J. You're likely to get the Coronavirus. Available from: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/02/covid- vaccine/607000/?utm_source=share&utm_campaign=share. [Last assessed on 2020 Oct 01].  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

 
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