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A study of prevalence and psychological correlates of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder


 Department of Psychiatry, Dr. D Y Patil Medical College, Dr. D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Suprakash Chaudhury,
Department of Psychiatry, Dr. D Y Patil Medical College, Dr. D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune - 411 018, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_656_20

Background: The premenstrual period is a vulnerable phase for prevalence of bodily and psychological signs and symptoms named the premenstrual syndrome (PMS). There is a paucity of Indian work in this area. Aim: The aim was to study the prevalence and psychological correlates of PMS and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital after obtaining the institute ethics committee clearance. Written informed consent was obtained from participants. By purposive sampling, 587 females from urban areas of Pimpri and Alandi were interviewed and subjected to the sociodemographic pro forma and the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool, Menstrual Symptom Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21. From this sample, 140 subjects meeting diagnostic criteria of PMS or PMDD were included in the study group. An equal number of age-matched healthy controls with no known psychiatric disorders after clinical interview were included in the control group. All the questionnaires were scored as per the test manuals. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS. Results: It was observed that 63.57% of the total cases are moderate PMS, 30.71% are severe PMS, and 5.71% are PMDD. Overall, the more common type of dysmenorrhea was the spasmodic type, but among the PMS/PMDD cases, the more common type of dysmenorrhea was the congestive type. There is significantly higher stress, anxiety, and depression and poorer sleep quality in the cases of PMS and PMDD as compared to the controls. Stress, anxiety, and depression have a significant positive correlation with poor sleep quality. Conclusions: The prevalence of PMS was 22.49% and that of PMDD was 1.36%. Congestive kind of dysmenorrhea was more frequently seen in cases of PMS. There is significantly higher stress, anxiety, depression, and disturbed sleep in females suffering from PMS and PMDD as compared to the controls.


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    -  Jadhav A
    -  Chaudhury S
    -  Saldanha D
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