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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
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System approach to combat challenges in implementing competency-based medical education in India


1 Preventive and Social Medicine, All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Scientist E (Medical), ICMR-Centre for Ageing and Mental Health, Indian Council of Medical Research, Division of Non-Communicable Diseases, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Date of Submission21-Sep-2021
Date of Decision19-Mar-2022
Date of Acceptance13-Apr-2022
Date of Web Publication14-Nov-2022

Correspondence Address:
Indranil Saha,
ICMR-Centre for Ageing and Mental Health, Division of Non-Communicable Diseases, Indian Council of Medical Research, Block DP-1, Sector V, Salt Lake, Kolkata - 700 091, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/mjdrdypu.mjdrdypu_762_21



How to cite this URL:
Paul B, Saha I. System approach to combat challenges in implementing competency-based medical education in India. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth [Epub ahead of print] [cited 2022 Dec 7]. Available from: https://www.mjdrdypv.org/preprintarticle.asp?id=361151



National Medical Commission (NMC) has rolled out the new Competency-Based Medical Education (CBME) in Medical Institutions of our country since the year 2019. This new curriculum was developed, keeping competency as the central theme. Competency is defined as the capability of a health professional which can be observed, and that includes various components like knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes. The competencies are identified according to the specific health needs of a particular country.[1] CBME curriculum in India is based on outcome-based competencies identified according to our societal needs.[2]

Our country is presently having the highest number of medical colleges (606) and has been enrolling the highest number of medical undergraduates (92065/per year) throughout the globe.[3] The previous curriculum was criticized to emphasize more on cognitive and psychomotor domain and less on affective domain. Many untoward incidents involving doctor–patient relationship in recent times in health care sectors have been attributed to the lack of communication skills of the treating physicians. The new CBME curriculum has been planned in such a way so as to give equal emphasis on all three domains so that our Indian Medical Graduates (IMG) will be competent enough to deliver their skill (psychomotor domain) affectionately (affective domain) with sound knowledge (cognitive domain). Thus the IMG will be equally good in knowledge with his/her attitude and skills.[2]

Some challenges regarding the implementation of this curriculum have already been identified in different settings in our country.[4],[5],[6],[7] In this present manuscript, a comprehensive framework has been provided regarding its challenges and possible intervention strategies in the framework of the system approach—input, process, and output [Table 1].
Table 1: Challenges in implementing CBME and possible solutions in systems approach framework

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Thus efforts must be initiated with dedicated involvement of all the stakeholders like medical educators, students, and policymakers in a collaborative mode to overcome the identified challenges for successful implementation of CBME throughout the country.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Modi JN, Gupta P, Singh T. Competency-based medical education, entrustment and assessment. Indian Pediatr 2015;52:413-20.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Mitra J, Saha I. Attitude and communication module in medical curriculum: Rationality and challenges. Indian J Public Health 2016;60:95-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
3.
National Medical Commission. Available from: https://www.nmc.org.in/information-desk/for-students-to-study-in-india/list-of-college-teaching-mbbs/. [Last accessed on 2022 March 19].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Hawkins RE, Welcher CM, Holmboe ES, Kirk LM, Norcini JJ, Simons KB, et al. Implementation of competency-based medical education: Are we addressing the concerns and challenges? Med Educ 2015;49:1086-102.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Suma MP, Suresh NM, Sendil KD. Challenges in implementation of the competency based medical education (CBME). Natl J Res Commun Med 2021;10:1-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Rajashree R, Chandrashekar DM. Competency-based medical education in India: A work in progress. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2020;64(Suppl_1):S7-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Hawkins RE, Welcher CM, Holmboe ES, Kirk LM, Norcini JJ, Simons KB, et al. Implementation of competency-based medical education: Are we addressing the concerns and challenges? Med Educ 2015;49:1086-102.  Back to cited text no. 7
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]



 

 
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